Posted: by HRNasty in Climbing Career Ladder, Company Culture, Manage your Manager, Recent Graduate

holiday parties

What do you want to be remembered for at your company holiday parties?

Holiday Party Part 2  (See part 1 of Holiday Parties here)

Link to the classic company party CLM

6.  If your company states what the dress code for that party is, FOLLOW DIRECTIONS.  Don’t try and prove a point by wearing jeans and a t-shirt.  Seriously.  CLM.  The company is spending a lot of money to show appreciation.  Don’t give them the finger.

Behavior indicates:  Blatant disregard for company direction.  Can you be trusted to represent your company on the outside?

7. Show up.  Not showing up to the company party is taken as a blatant statement.  “I don’t want to spend time with you people, and even free food isn’t enough to bring me out.”  It is insulting.  If you have a good reason to be absent, we get that, but we also remember it.  We really remember making a habit of not showing up to company functions.  You won’t get fired, but you won’t get promoted with this move.

Behavior indicates:  Do you WANT to entertain clients, onboard new hires, manage others? The company needs to believe that you not only “can” make an impact, but you “want” to.   Let them know you drink the company Kool-Aid.

8.  Send a thank you card to your manager, department head, or CEO.  Depending on the size of your company you should be able to figure out who the appropriate person is.  They spent a TON of money on this function.  Trust me, 2 out of 100 will do this.  You are not sucking up, you are saying “thank you”.  It is civilized; it is the right thing to do.

Behavior Indicates:  Will you take care of the customer?  Will you follow-up?  Say thank you even when you are declined the account?

9.  Make sure your spouse is on their best behavior and dressed appropriately.  You want to be remembered for your business mind, not for the fact that you “got game” or your home life is F’d.  Think of it this way.  Your spouse is going to be meeting your manager is equivalent to your spouse meeting your parents.  Your department head or VP is your grandparent.  Who you bring to social events makes an impact to your personal friends.  It makes the same impact to your co-workers.  If you show up with a spouse that behaves, dresses, drinks, or eats inappropriately, it might as well be you.  Managers want confidence in their employees.   It is NOT that they want to know there are no distractions and the home life is good.  They could care less.  But they will rationalize any dip in your behavior if they suspect your home life isn’t stable.  It’s called gossip and there is a reason The National Enquirer sells.

Behavior indicates:  Back to entertaining guests and hosting parties.  Do they have to worry about your spouse being supportive of you and the company.

10.  Make introductions.  Introduce your significant other to your manager and department head.  If children are present, introduce them as well.  Make sure your S.O. will introduce themselves if you become separated.  Say goodbye to the same people you make introductions to and say “thank you”.  Don’t just “duck out”.

11.  Don’t drive drunk.  Get a ride, call a cab, or crash on the floor.  If you work in an HR department, provide cab vouchers.

Nuff said.

HRNasty
 
HRNasty works for a privately held start-up alongside a small and dedicated group of geeks, hipsters, and technical bad asses’s.  Our Christmas party is to say “thank you” to not just them for their hard work, but to their spouses for the patience and flexibility.  We will serve alcohol and plenty of it.   Fun has a different definition for everyone, and we don’t just respect that, we embrace it.  The CEO will stand up and say, “nothing you say or do will affect your career on this night.”  We will drive this point home.  My hope is that this is the best party folks will attend all year-long.   Together we are building a culture of “work harder than you ever have and play harder than you ever have”, where the management team will blow off steam at a pace that will be hard to follow.  I came to this company to work in a place where people can concentrate on their work and not what others think, where there are no rules, only guidelines.  Meritocracy plain and simple.

To the folks I have the fortune to work with.  Thanks for allowing me to be part of this special group.  Look for me out on the deck.  I will have plenty of Cuban Cigars for anyone interested, and hope we relax, talk shop, and dream about 2013.  My only request is to pay attention to guideline number 11.

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